African tourists emerge as powerhouse for tourism on the continent, says UNCTAD report

Four out of 10 international tourists in Africa come from the continent itself, according to the new UNCTAD Economic Development in Africa Report 2017: Tourism for Transformative and Inclusive Growth.

Image result for travel noire africa

Pic Credit: Travel Noire

In sub-Saharan Africa, this number increases to two out of every three tourists whose travels originate on the continent. Data backing this key finding show that, contrary to perception, Africans themselves are increasingly driving tourism demand in Africa.

Tourism in Africa is a flourishing industry that supports more than 21 million jobs, or 1 in 14 jobs, on the continent. Over the last two decades, Africa has recorded robust growth, with international tourist arrivals and tourism revenues growing at 6 per cent and 9 per cent, respectively, each year between 1995 and 2014.

Focusing on tourism for transformative and inclusive growth, this year’s report encourages African countries to harness the dynamism of the tourism sector.

By collecting and comparing data from two different periods, 1995-1998 and 2011-2014, the report reveals that international tourist arrivals to Africa increased from 24 million to 56 million. Tourism export revenues more than tripled, increasing from $14 billion to approximately $47 billion. As a result, tourism now contributes about 8.5 per cent to the continent’s gross domestic product (GDP).

The First Ten-Year Implementation Plan of the African Union’s Agenda 2063 aims at doubling the contribution of tourism to the continent’s GDP. To meet this target, tourism needs to grow at a faster and stronger pace.

“Tourism is a dynamic sector with phenomenal potential in Africa. Properly managed, it can contribute immensely to diversification and inclusion for vulnerable communities,” said Mukhisa Kituyi, the Secretary-General of UNCTAD.

To realize the potential of intraregional tourism for the continent’s economic growth, African Governments should take steps to liberalize air transport, promote the free movement of persons, ensure currency convertibility and, crucially, recognize the value of African tourism and plan for it. These strategic measures can have relatively fast and tangible impacts. In Rwanda, the abolition of visa requirements for fellow members of the East African Community in 2011 helped increase intraregional tourists from 283,000 in 2010, to 478,000 in 2013.

Another important theme highlighted in the report is the mutually beneficial relationship between peace and tourism. Peace is of course fundamental for tourism. The mere appearance of instability in a region can deter tourists, leading to devastating, long-lasting economic consequences. However, the perception of danger does not always correspond with reality.

The 2014 Ebola outbreak in Western Africa had a very high cost in terms of tourism numbers and revenue lost across the entire continent. Despite being limited to relatively few countries in the western part of the continent, tourist arrivals and bookings fell in countries as far from the outbreak as South Africa and the United Republic of Tanzania.

The report notes that the economic impacts of political instability can be quite significant and long-lasting. For example, following political instability in Tunisia, total tourism receipts in 2009-2011 declined by 27 per cent on average, from $3.5 billion in 2009 to $2.5 billion in 2011.

Addressing safety and security concerns and swift responses to crises by African Governments and regional institutions are paramount to the growth of tourism in Africa. Promoting strategies aimed at improving Africa’s image in the global media are also critical in ensuring the sector’s recovery after conflict or political unrest.

During the next decade, tourism’s continued growth is expected to generate an additional 11.7 million jobs in Africa. Furthermore, where tourism thrives, women thrive. In Africa, more than 30 per cent of tourism businesses are run by women; and 36 per cent of its tourism ministers are women, which is the highest share in the world.

Image result for african women in tourism industry

Pic Credit: UN Multimedia

Creating firm links between tourism, the agriculture and infrastructure sectors, ecotourism and the medical and cultural tourism market segments can foster diversification into higher value activities and distribute incomes more broadly. To unlock this potential, African Governments should adopt measures that support local sourcing, encourage local entities’ participation in the tourism value chain and boost infrastructure development. This continued investment into the tourism sector in Africa could lift millions out of poverty, while also contributing to peace and security in the region.

See full article here

See UNCTAD report here

Source: TRALAC

An Alternative Perspective on Africa Rising

Listen again

Is Africa’s growth trajectory overhyped? Is it as Omidyar Network’s Ory Okolloh call, ‘a fetishisation’ over some of the continent’s development achievements at the heavy expense of turning a blind eye to the weighty issues? As she concernedly asks, “will technology ‘save’ the continent from its poorly run resources, bad leadership and ineptitude?” Is Africa really rising? And if she is indeed rising, who are the beneficiaries? This was the subject addressed by Winnie Byanyima, Executive Director of Oxfam International when she spoke at LSE on 12 October 2015.

Credit: Africa at LSE

“As I prepared to come here to give my views on this topic, I promised myself I would not be an Afro pessimist,” she announced. “My job has me talking about poverty everyday but being an African girl, I can say that I am proud of what Africa has achieved. I am proud of my country, the continent and her people and at the grassroots especially, you see a true reflection of the resilience of her people.”

“Africa has witnessed four centuries of slave trade, one century of colonialism totalling five centuries of domination with just 60 years of independence,” she continued. “Growing up in Uganda, I know what it feels like to have false freedom and false independence. I grew up with a leader, Idi Amin, who would decide overnight new legislations pinning them to what he claimed lucid dreams; dreams of women without make-up, skirts, and more aggravating, education. But regardless of this, we took on the risk of getting an education with the support of ordinary people who inspired resilience,” she reminisced.

Today, African economies are growing at an average rate of 5% per year and Foreign Direct Investment has expanded by over 30%. Fewer mothers die in child birth and the rate of child mortality has decreased tremendously. The continent boasts several of the fastest growing economies in the world and is posited to leapfrog in development through its ever growing innovation and technology. “The universities are hotbeds of innovation,” the speaker stated with a smile. “However, despite all this, one in two Africans lives in extreme poverty. Women are the hardest hit earning 30% less than men.”

“The most important question I would ask you today is, Africa is rising but it is rising for whom?” she poses.

“Jane is my mother’s god-daughter. She was married at 16 years old and not out of choice but for labour. She was a successful farmer tilling her husband’s land. She lost three of her children to curable diseases but due to poverty, she had to bear the burden of burying her own. Her husband too passed on. I am helping her to build on her husband’s land but now she wants to leave it to her son. Under Ugandan law, she can claim the land but as a second wife, the land belongs to the son of the first wife. When she came to ask for money to buy the land from her son, I challenged her to claim what was rightfully hers to which she opposed.” Through this poignant story, Winnie Byanyima unmasks the reality of Africa, her people and the challenges they face on a daily basis; challenges of legacies of discrimination regulated by traditions and custom.

“Increasing the income share of the poor and middle class increases growth; illicit financial flows alone make Africa a net creditor to the rest of the world,” she informs. “Tax reforms need to be fit for purpose.”

“I have worked in several positions but none compares to working at Oxfam International where I feel that I can challenge elite capture. I love this job because I can speak truth to power,” she affirms. “Power lies with organised citizens because it is through solidarity that power shifts. Africa is the youngest region yet the oldest and by the year 2030 we will see a demographic dividend. My hope is that we will have halved the tax gap and these resources will be channelled to health, education and social protection thus investing in Africa’s true wealth, her people.”

This article is based on a LSE Public Lecture with Winnie Byanyima, Executive Director of Oxfam International. Follow this link to listen to the full lecture.

Article Originally posted on Africa at LSE 

I too hold the mantle: International Day of Democracy

Today, 15th September 2015, little or not so little fifteen year old Muteteli from Rwanda aspires to one day be Member of Parliament. She aspires to represent constituents from her region, help young children grow up to be the best they could possibly be; to live to their full potential. Young Muteteli aspires to assist farmers to produce more food for internal use and export, teachers be well qualified, hospitals to have well run facilities and to overall harness the energies and innovation of the promising Rwandan youth.

“I will one day be Member of Parliament, I will make good decisions and I will make Rwanda proud,” she muses amidst a smile. Are her dreams valid? Very much so.

(The Bring Back Our Girls Movement)

If one asks Muteteli whether she is aware of what a civil society organization is, she will quickly respond with a resounding yes. “They are the people who hold my Member of Parliament representative accountable and raise issues on what needs to be done more of.” If one probes further on whether she would want a civil society during her parliamentary tenure, the answer is also a resounding yes. “Just as my mother holds me to account on my wrongs, I too want people to tell me where I should focus my energies.”

Ban Ki moon rightly put it when he stated that civil society is the oxygen of democracy. It acts as a catalyst for social progress and economic growth and plays a critical role in keeping Government accountable; helps represent the diverse interests of the population, including its most vulnerable groups; that being the women and youth.

Article 29 of the African Charter on Democracy, Elections and Governance stipulates that, ‘State Parties shall recognize the crucial role of women in development and strengthening of democracy.’

What does this mean?

In the words of Rwandan President Paul Kagame, “No one benefits if women are held back; we have to change mind sets, not just laws. In Rwanda, more women than ever before are serving in positions of responsibility and leadership in government and in the work place. These role models, in turn, shape the expectations and the missions of the next generations”.

Pic Credit: Huffington Post

Democracy and its ideals as defined by the United Nations is a universal value based on the freely expressed will of people to determine their own political, economic, social and cultural systems and their full participation in all aspects of their lives. This means that there is rule of law whereby constitutions are upheld, term limits are respected, civil society groups can exercise their freedoms whilst holding government to account, elections are free and fair and the institutions within the state are free to deliver on public services equitably without interference from bureaucratic red tape and corruption.

This year’s International Day of Democracy theme is on creating spaces for civil society and a study by Civicus indicates a nexus between democracy, civil society engagement and women’s leadership.

Beginning with its leadership, it is reported Rwanda claimed the world’s highest percentage of women in parliament in 2003 and today, its women hold 64% of the country’s legislative seats. Rwanda is arguably run efficiently and effectively with a fast rising private sector and civil society which is steered by pragmatic sound policies and legislation from its political institutions. The study indicates that Rwandan civil society’s greatest strengths is its relatively positive values; that its civil society, to a great extent, nurtures and upholds positive values such as anti-corruption practices, gender equity, poverty eradication, tolerance and democracy promotion. This is a country that survived genocide in the 90’s and more or less built its economy from scratch.

The African Union came to the succinct realization that women hold the mantle in promoting democracy and good governance and as such, during its 24th Heads of State Summit in January 2015, ended with a strong call for women’s empowerment in Africa as a step towards achieving the goals of Agenda 2063, its blueprint development strategy for the next 50 years.

 

Pic Credit: Afronline.org

It cannot be overemphasized how crucial the role of civil society and more so women’s participation in democracy building is.  Ban Ki moon also rightly put it when he stated as follows:

Women hold up more than half the sky and represent much of the world’s unrealized potential. They are the educators. They raise the children. They hold families together and increasingly drive economies. They are natural leaders. We need their full engagement… in government, business and civil society.

Finance Her Future: Gender Responsive Budgeting

Pic Credit: World Bank Group

Pic Credit: World Bank Group

As the Third International Conference on Financing for Development drew to a close about two weeks ago and the most anticipated state visit of the year came to an end on Sunday 26th July in Kenya, one key message that’s rang through in these separate events is that, a state cannot achieve its full potential without empowering it’s women and girls.

President Barack Hussein Obama in his well-articulated magnanimous speech which received a boisterous applause from Kenyans and global citizens alike put it simply when he stated, “Treating women as second-class citizens is a bad tradition: it holds you back. There’s no excuse for sexual assault or domestic violence, there’s no reason that young girls should suffer genital mutilation, there’s no place in a civilized society for the early or forced marriage of children. These traditions may go back centuries; but they have no place in the 21st century.”

He continued, “They are issues of right or wrong in any culture. But they are also issues of success and failure. Any nation that fails to educate its girls or employ its women and allow them to maximize their potential is doomed to fall behind the global economy. We’re in a sports centre: imagine if you have a team and don’t let half of the team play. That’s stupid. That makes no sense!”

So how then can countries especially those in Africa address this elephant in the room? The big G.E – Gender Equality Debate.

Consistently, social justice advocates have reiterated time and again that this can only begin by transformation of mindsets and perceptions.  And I agree entirely. Policy makers alike have also reiterated that beyond psycho-social transformation, there is need for gender responsive budgeting. Again I agree, and wish to speak more on this today.

What is gender responsive budgeting? What does it ideally look like? Was it reflected in the text of the Addis Ababa Action Agenda outcome document?

Borrowing from the analysis of UN Women, national development plans and strategies identify development priorities and articulate how these will be implemented, financed and monitored. Often, gender equality commitments are not adequately considered or included during the design, implementation and financing stages of planning. Despite efforts to formulate national action plans for gender equality and sectoral gender strategies, these are rarely integrated in national development priority setting and plans. Implementing gender equality commitments requires governments to take a series of actions including formulating policies that remove gender-based discrimination and guarantee women’s rights. Such actions require financial resources, institutional capacity and accountability systems that should be integrated in national plans and budgets in order to enable implementation.

Ministries of Finance have the mandate to set up public finance management systems, define budget ceilings and ensure sound macro-economic frameworks. Gender analysis supports ministries of finance to make better budget choices by highlighting existing gender gaps and the impact of public expenditures and revenue-raising on women and girls.

The Addis Ababa Action Agenda was anticipated to be an instrument that would deliver in addressing some of the gender financing gaps as well as unlock the barriers. Did it deliver as much? Arguably no.

In their very well-articulated Op-ed in the Guardian, Ana Ines Abelenda and Nerea Craviotto argue that the text is almost entirely devoid of specific proposals that can be swiftly implemented to champion for women’s rights and address gender inequality. In my opinion the text has also to a large extent strongly diverted attention from the role of states in removing the global obstacles to development, abdicating their duties through public finance and domestic resource mobilization to the heavily dominated and unregulated private sector.

The two cement this concern and reverberate succinctly as follows, “Rather than encouraging states to remove obstacles to development, mobilize official development assistance and commit adequate public resources, this approach puts the emphasis on private sector contributions,” – the very same sector that is highly unregulated and has evidently exacerbated women’s rights in the social and economic sectors. The article continues, “As a result, little attention is given to structural barriers to women’s economic rights or their ability to access, own and control economic resources. The unequal distribution of unpaid care work, poor access to health care services and natural resources, persistent gender discrimination in the labour market – all went largely ignored by the Addis delegates.”

“In addition, many OECD governments are shying away from aid commitments, preferring instead to rely on private sector contributions in the form of foreign direct investment and public-private partnerships. Again, this is problematic. As the women’s working group argues, private sector activities, including public-private partnerships, are promoted in the Addis agenda with scant regard for accountability mechanisms to uphold human rights standards, including environmental and social safeguards. Moreover, insufficient attention has been paid to the cost of public-private partnerships and the quality of services and infrastructure they will deliver.”

It is indeed common knowledge that national fiscal & tax systems must undergo deep reforms in order to ensure fairness and progressivity and as Phumzile Mlambo Ngcuka, Executive Director UN Women articulated, “To close persistent gender gaps in health, education, employment, justice, and decision-making, the chronic underinvestment in women and girls must be urgently reversed.”

Is the fight over? From the various arguments written during and after the conference, I would say the general mood is that it’a far from it; social justice advocates have chosen to see the financing for development conference as a foundation to address inequalities within and among states and particularly in championing for girls and women’s rights. Financing their future is a reality, but the work has only just begun.

Winnie Byanyima, Executive Director of Oxfam International put it well when she stated as follows, “Citizens from all around the world must continue to challenge rigged rules that favour vested interests, and governments must listen. 2015 can still deliver the change we need towards a fairer future.”

UN Women steers three high-level side events at the Financing for Development Conference

On the second day of the Third Financing for Development Conference, taking place in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia from 13-16 July 2015, UN Women organized three official high-level side events to highlight the importance of transformative financing on gender equality and women’s empowerment.

(Photo: UN Photo/Eskinder Debebe)

In the morning session on July 14th, together with the World Bank Group, UN Women hosted a high-level event on “Financing for Gender Equality: Results and Good Practices”, with panelists including United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, Prime Minister of Sweden Stefan Löfvén, India’s Minister of State for Finance Jayant Sinha, former Minister of Finance from Nigeria Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, President of the World Bank Group Jim Yong Kim, and President and CEO of the Global Fund for Women Musimbi Kanyoro, and Mastercard Executive Director of International Development Tara Nathan. The panel was moderated by UN Women Executive Director Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka.

“By 2030 there must be complete 50:50 gender equality. Let’s commit today”, the Secretary-General emphasized in his remarks. He reminded participants that the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) can only be achieved with an “equally ambitious financing agenda” that benefits all.

“We know based on evidence that gender equality is not only a condition for social justice but a power that can bring about social justice,” said World Bank President Jim Yong Kim.

The Prime Minister of Sweden said 2015 is the year to “close the gap between talking and doing … I challenge all actors involved in the SDGs to support Gender-Responsive Budgeting. It is a joint challenge and it is an opportunity.”

(Photo: UN Women/Binyam Teshome.)

The second UN Women official side event “Transformative Financing for Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment- Catalyzing Action on the Addis Ababa Accord”, attended by UN Women Deputy Executive Director Lakshmi Puri, provided an opportunity for Member States and partners to share examples of implementing gender equality, ranging from policies, to laws, programmes, the allocation of resources as well as the need to track spending and impact of those for women and girls. The Addis Ababa Action Plan for Transformative Financing for gender equality and women’s empowerment was launched at the event.

“We need money, and we need smart money”, stressed Justine Greening, Secretary of State for International Development of the United Kingdom, on the importance of catalyzing actions in Addis Ababa and beyond. To achieve gender equality, she said targeted actions and concrete commitments are needed.

Geraldine Fraser-Moleketi, Special Envoy for Gender of the African Development Bank (AfDB), emphasized the need for national ownership because “how the money is used at the country level is determined at the country level.”

Meanwhile, Claver Gatete, Minister of Finance and Economic Planning from Rwanda, stressed that new structures and systems cannot succeed without changing mindsets and perceptions. Participants called for intensified efforts on gender-responsive budgeting and endorsed an Action Plan for Transformative Financing for Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment.

(Photo: UN Women/Binyam Teshome.)

The last UN Women official side-event of the day “Financing for Gender Equality- Placing Women at the Centre of the SDGs in Africa” contextualized the discussions on transformative financing for women’s empowerment, bringing together stakeholders from government, the UN system, and civil society organizations to discuss innovative ways for financing gender equality. An interactive panel discussion involved policymakers from Ministries of Finance, Ministries of Gender as well as other development partners and UN agencies.

Giovanie Biha, Deputy Executive Secretary of UNECA, stressed that Africa’s transformation “relies on the potential of its people, especially women and girls.” Noting that gender will be mainstreamed in 11 out of the 17 goals of the SDGs, with one goal dedicated to gender equality and women’s empowerment, she said: “Our hope today is that Member States will invest more and invest well, with targeted and early interventions, with policies and adequate resource allocation.”

Zenebu Tadesse Woldetsadik, Ethiopia’s Minister of Gender, Women, Children and Youth Affairs outlined her government’s strides in increasing women in parliament and its 5-Year Growth and Transformational Plan, in which gender is a critical stand-alone goal.

Highlighting the critical role of adolescent girls in Africa’s transformation, UN Women Executive Director Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka stressed the need to continue investing in education and garnering political will: “We have enough human capital, but we need political will and the determination of our leaders.”

Throughout the day, speakers and panelists agreed that frameworks and commitments are important; however, these must be put into action through transformative and adequate resources, while tracking spending and impact.

– See more at: http://africa.unwomen.org/en/news-and-events/stories/2015/07/un-women-steers-three-high-level-side-events-at-the-financing-for-development-conference#sthash.h8Pj0ibk.dpuf

Memorable Quotes from African Women in Power

With a population of over 1 billion, Africa is the second-largest and second most populous continent in the world. Of the total number of people, more than half are female, with an estimated 56% between the age of 15-64.

Below are 5 memorable quotes from influential and powerful women in Africa.

Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, President of Liberia

African Women_Ellen

Ellen Johnson Sirleaf is globally-recognized for her role in stabilizing Liberia as the country’s president shortly after civil war. In an excerpt from her book, This Child Will Be Great: Memoir of a Remarkable Life by Africa’s First Woman President, Nobel Peace Prize winning author offers inspiring words to rising leaders.

“The size of your dreams must always exceed your current capacity to achieve them. If your dreams do not scare you, they are not big enough.”

Catherine Samba-Panza, President of Central African Republic

African Women_CAR

When her country spiraled into deadly sectarian violence in 2013, government leaders looked to replace the current president with an interim leader who could provide a unique perspective to peace talks. In January 2014, Catherine Samba-Panza, the Mayor of Central African Republic‘s capital city, was elected to the presidency. In an interview with The Guardian shortly after she was sworn in, the former corporate lawyer talked about her advocacy work for African women.

“The majority of my sisters and daughters in the Central African Republic don’t know their rights so they can’t defend them. But we who know our rights can help them. We must always help them: the battle is always to promote and protect the rights of women.”

Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, Former Finance Minister of Nigeria

Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala may arguably be one of Africa’s most recognized female leaders. Shortly before moving back to Nigeria to join government as the Minister of Finance, Okonjo-Iweala was a Managing Director at the World Bank. In this 2008 TED talk, she speaks to Africa’s shift from encouraging foreign aid to increasing foreign investment.

“Africans…they are tired. They’re tired of being the subject of everybody’s charity and care. We are grateful, but we know that we can take charge of our own destinies if we have the will to reform.”

Nkosazana Clarice Dlamini Zuma, Chairperson of the African Union Commission

African Women_AU

As the head of the African Union, the South African political leader has stood as the face of the continent in political platforms around the world.

“It’s in [the West’s] advantage to know what’s happening in Africa because if they don’t come to the party eventually the party will happen without them.”

Dr. Isatou Njie Saidy, Vice President of The Gambia

African Women

Though Dr. Isatou Njie Saidy serves as second-in-command for one of Africa’s smallest countries, there is no ignoring her big voice. In an address delivered during the 2011 UN General Assembly, Saidy reminded world leaders that the continent should be approached as a diverse place and not a country.

“Africa is no longer the colony of any country and must be respected and treated as such.”

Source: http://www.africa.com

2015 List of Scholarships for African women and Developing Countries

A number of organisations encourage women empowerment through education at different levels by offering specific scholarships for African women from Africa and developing countries. Although women looking for scholarships can as well apply for other scholarship programmes that are non-gender specific, there are sponsorship programmes that reduce the competition by offering their scholarship programmes solely for women. From the archives of AfterschoolAfrica, below is an updated list of scholarships (undergraduate, Masters, MBA and PhD) that are open for women from African and developing countries. Some of these scholarships are for international students but are also open for the said demography.

Please note that application deadlines and other information provided on this site can change at any time. You are therefore advised to visit the recommended scholarship organisation website.Scholarships for African Women

MasterCard Foundation Scholarships Program at Wellesley College, USA

As part of the Scholars Program, Wellesley will provide nine (9) African women with comprehensive support that includes scholarships, mentoring, counseling, and internship opportunities. Scholars at Wellesley will build experiences, values, and competencies that are critical to success in the global economy, and that enable them to give back to their communities and home countries.

Previous Deadline March 1

Google Anita Borg Memorial Scholarships for Women in Africa, Europe and the Middle East

Google offers The Google Anita Borg Memorial Scholarshipfor women in Europe, the Middle East and Africa to study in the field of computing and technology for Bachelors, Masters or PhD degrees.

Previous Deadline 1 February

VLIR- UOS Masters & Training Scholarships in Belgium for African and Developing Countries

VLIR-UOS offers 180 Masters & 70 training Scholarships in Belgium for students from Developing countries – 50% of scholarships will be offered to African students and almost 50% for Women. The eligible training or master programmes are taught in English.

Previous Deadline 1 February

MMMF Scholarship for Women from Developing Countries in US & Canada

Margaret McNamara Memorial Fund (MMMF) scholarship applications for female students from Developing Countries who are currently studying in the United States or Canada

Previous Deadline: January 9th

MMMF Grants for Women Studying in South Africa

The Margaret McNamara Memorial Fund (MMMF) grants will be offered for female students from developing countries who are currently studying in South Africa at the University of Pretoria, the University of Cape Town, University of Stellenbosch or the University of Witwatersrand

Previous Deadline 19 August

NWAG Scholarship for Nigerian Women

Each year the Nigerian Women Association of Georgia -NWAG- offers undergraduate Scholarships for 37 Nigerian female students (one per state of origin) in Nigerian universities on any course of study, in the amount of fifty thousand Naira (N50,000)

Previous deadline: May 30

SG Conference MasterCard Foundation Scholarship for Africa, Latin America and Asia – 50% for Women

In the spirit of fostering a diverse learning environment, Oxfam America has signed a contract with the MasterCard Foundation to award partial scholarships for travel to the SG 2013 Savings Groups Conference. Women are strongly encouraged to apply for this opportunity.

Previous Deadline March 4 & 5th

MILEAD Empowerment and Leadership Fellowship for Young African Women

The MILEAD Fellows Program is a one-year leadership development program designed to identify, develop and promote emerging young African Women leaders to attain and succeed in leadership in their community and Africa as a whole.

Previous Deadline March 15

Wangari Maathai Scholarship Funds for Kenyan Women– Undergraduate

The Wangari Maathai Scholarship Fund is an environmental innovations fund set up in memory of Prof. Wangari Maathai that is aimed at developing action-oriented young people with strong values and commitment to the conservation of the physical and social environment in Kenya. In this first year, the tertiary education scholarship will be awarded to a young woman aged 18 to 25 years, who has demonstrated passion and personal commitment to environmental conservation.

Previous Deadline 30th November

JAUW International Fellowships Programme for Women

The Japanese Association of University Women currently announced its International Fellowships Programme for women who are carrying out or would like to carry out independent research or advanced study at postgraduate level in Japan.

Previous Deadline April 10

AAUW International Fellowship for Women, Masters & Doctoral program in USA

AAUW International Fellowships are awarded for full-time study or research in the United States to women who are not U.S. citizens or permanent residents. Both graduate and postgraduate studies at accredited U.S. institutions are supported.

Previous deadline December 1

WAAW Foundation Scholarship for African Women

The Working to Advance African Women (WAAW) foundation aim to increase the pipeline of African women in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) related disciplines, and work to ensure that this talent is engaged in African innovation. WAAW Foundation offers Annual Scholarship program for Undergraduate African female students.

Previous deadline 30 October

Schlumberger Foundation Fellowship Grant for Women from Developing countries

The Faculty of the Future Leader offers PhD & PostDoctoral Fellowship for Women from Developing Countries and emerging economies sponsored by the Schlumberger Foundation.

Application Deadline November 16

Microsoft Research Graduate Women’s Scholarships, USA

The Microsoft Research Graduate Women’s Scholarship is a one-year scholarship program for outstanding women graduate students and is designed to help increase the number of women pursuing a PhD. This program supports women in the second year of their graduate studies.

Previous deadline October 16

Women in Aviation Scholarships for International Students

To be eligible to apply for the Women in Aviation scholarship, scholarship applicants must be a member of Women in Aviation, International.

Previous Deadline November 12

Makerere University offers Undergraduate Scholarships for Female Students, Uganda

The Makerere University Female Scholarship Foundation (FSF) was launched in November 2010 as a continuation of the Makerere University Female Scholarship Initiative (FSI).

Previous deadline 17 August

International Federation of University Women (IFUW) Human Rights Fellowships for women in Any Country

The Conchita Poncini Jimenez Human Rights Fellowship for women by the International Federation of University Women (IFUW) will be awarded for advanced research, an internship or study related to the use of human rights instruments and agreements for the advancement of women.

Previous deadline June 30

Switzerland- Nestle MBA Scholarships for Women Developing Countries

The Nestlé Scholarship for Women was first awarded in 1997 and was initiated by a group of IMD- Switzerland- MBA (Masters in Business Administration) participants who desired to encourage women to take the MBA courses. Preference are given to women from developing countries.

Previous deadline 30 September

UNESCO-L’OREAL International Fellowships for Women from Developing Countries in Life Sciences

UNESCO -L’OREAL international Fellowships Programme for Young Women from Developing Countries  in research developments in the field of life sciences: biology, biochemistry, biotechnology, agriculture, medicine, pharmacy and physiology in France and abroad.

Previous deadline 15 July

ESMT Germany African Scholarships for Full MBA Applicants

ESMT is offering a number of merit-based scholarships for applicants to the Full-time MBA program commencing January and the Executive MBA program beginning October.

Postgraduate Training Fellowships for Women Scientists from Sub-Saharan Africa and LDC

Postgraduate Training Fellowships for Women is offered for women Scientists from Sub-Saharan Africa and Least Developed Countries (LDC) at Centres of Excellence in the South for research in Natural sciences related fields.

Previous deadline 31 July

Amelia Earhart Fellowship for Women- PhD Scholarship

Women of any nationality pursuing a Ph.D./doctoral degree who demonstrate a superior academic record in the field of aerospace-related sciences and aerospace-related engineering are eligible.

Previous deadline 15 November

Delta State Government Scholarship Scheme for female students

Applications are invited for five places in the Delta State Government Scholarship Scheme for female students, tenable at SMC, Pan-African University, for the programme PGD in Media & Communication (Journalism Stream).

Previous Deadline May 31

Campbell Fellowship for Women Scholar-Practitioners from Developing Nation

The Vera R. Campbell Foundation funded Fellowship is offered for female postdoctoral social scientist from a developing country whose work addresses women’s economic and social empowerment in that nation.

Previous deadline 1 November

PEO International Peace Scholarship fund for Women – USA and Canada

The PEO International Peace Scholarship Fund is a program of Women helping women reach for the stars. The fund provides scholarships for selected women from other countries for graduate study in the United States and Canada.

Previous deadline December 15 and April 1

Deutsche Bank Scholarships for Women at London Business School

The Deutsche Bank scholarship is award to four MBA and Masters in Finance female students in the AMOUNT of £20,000 each. These extremely generous awards are designed to enable talented women with an interest in the finance sector to study at London Business School.

Previous deadline 18 April

African Guest Researchers’ Scholarship Programme, Sweden

Africa Guest Researcher Scholarships at Nordic Africa Institute (NAI), Sweden for African Researchers /Scholars 2013 – With preference to Women Researchers.

Previous deadline 1 April

Dorothy Marchus Senesh Fellowship For Women From Developing Countries in USA

The International Peace Research Association Foundation (IPRA), USA invites applications for the Dorothy Marchus Senesh Fellowship for Women from Developing Countries in Peace and Development Studies

VCU Undergraduate Scholarship for the Advancement of Women USA

The VCU (Virginia Commonwealth University) Scholarship Award for the Advancement of Women is sponsored by the VCU Department of Business Services through proceeds generated by the sale of class rings and graduation-related items through the Jostens Company.

Previous deadline: 21 February

SAWISE Hope Scholarship for South African Women in Science and Technology

The Association of South African Women in Science and Engineering (SAWISE) and The Hope Network invites female students entering their Honours level/ 4th year of study to apply for the SAWISE Hope scholarship.

Previous deadline: 30 November

Angus SA WISE Scholarship for Sub-Saharan African Woman

The Association of South African Women in Science and Engineering (SA WISE) is a dynamic association for all those who support the idea of strengthening the role of women in science and engineering in South Africa. Each year SA WISE awards the Angus Scholarship to a Sub-Saharan black woman graduate with 70% or above grade average in her subject of study.

Previous deadline 30 November

Women in Business Scholarship by ENPC School of International Management, France

The ENPC School of International Management offers a specific scholarship scheme to those female candidates who demonstrate an outstanding leadership potential and a rich business experience.

Previous deadline 23 September

Leadership and Advocacy for Women in Africa (LAWA) Fellowship Program

The Leadership and Advocacy for Women in Africa (LAWA) Fellowship Program was founded in 1993 at the Georgetown University Law Center in Washington, D.C., in order to train women’s human rights lawyers from Africa who are committed to returning home to their countries in order to advance the status of women and girls in their own countries throughout their careers.

OSISA Scholarship for SADC Women Media Leaders at Rhodes University, South Africa

South African Women Media Leaders who wish to study media management and leadership at the Rhodes University’s Sol Plaatje Institute (SPI), South Africa for Media Leadership are invited to apply for postgraduate scholarships offered by the Open Society Initiative for Southern Africa (OSISA).

Previous deadline 30 September

INSEAD Alumni Fund (IAF) Women’s Scholarships

The scholarship seeks bright, dynamic and motivated women who are making significant achievements in their professional and/or personal lives.

Deadline 11 February and 18 August each year

Jane M Klausman Women In Business Scholarship

The Jane M. Klausman Women in Business Scholarship program helps women pursue undergraduate and Master’s degrees in business management and overcome gender barriers from the classroom to the boardroom.

Previous deadline: 1 July

Fondation Rainbow Bridge MBA Scholarship for Women from Africa and Asia

The Fondation Rainbow Bridge will enable young women scholars to enrich their academic background by obtaining an HEC MBA in France. This scholarship is available for women from Asian or African countries affected by natural disasters, drought or famine.

Annual Deadline: June and November

Professor De Winter Scholarship for Women at University of Twente, Netherlands

Master’s Scholarship in any subject at University of Twente for Female/Women Students of Non-EU/EEA Countries in Netherlands.

Previous deadline 1 April

UNESCO-Japan Research Fellowship for Women in Developing Countries

The Government of Japan offers 20 fellowships per year, to deserving candidates from UNESCO developing countries, especially the least developed countries (LDCs), who are eager to undertake research on one or more of the topics listed below.

Previous deadline 13 January

Zawadi Africa Education Fund Undergraduate Scholarship for Women- in Partnership with Google

The Zawadi Africa Education Fund is a program designed to provide undergraduate scholarships to academically gifted girls/ women from disadvantaged backgrounds from Africa to pursue higher education in the US.

IFUW International Scholarship for Women- Fellowships and Grants

The International Federation of University Women offers a limited number of international fellowships and grants to women graduates for postgraduate research, study and training. Applicants may be of any nationality.

Deadline between August and mid-September

Funds for Women Graduates Scholarship Grants for PhD/ Doctoral Study & Research

Funds for Women Graduates- FfWG offers Foundation Grants to help women graduates with their living expenses (not fees) while registered for study or research at an approved institution of higher education in Great Britain.

Previous deadline 4 April

NUS PHD-MBA Scholarship for International Students, Singapore, Asia

A doctoral programme for entrepreneurial scientists and engineers

The National University of Singapore – NUS PhD-MBA aims to attract and train talented science and engineering international students who have the potential to create and lead technology companies through scholarship programs. Students develop their research skills by doing a PhD in a scientific or engineering discipline, choosing among a wide range of departments and advisers. Concurrently, they develop their business acumen by working on an MBA degree at the NUS Business School. Previous deadline for August intake: 7th January

Forté Foundation MBA Fellows for Women

Forté Foundation offers fellowships to women who are pursuing a full-time, part-time or executive MBA education at participating business schools. Forté Foundation Fellowships are intended to increase the number of women applying to and enrolling in MBA programs. Students of all nationalities are eligible for consideration.

Global Fund for Women Grants

The Global Fund for Women supports women’s groups that advance the human rights of women and girls. The Organization strengthen women’s right groups based outside the United States by providing small, flexible, and timely grants ranging from $500 to $30,000 for operating and program expenses.
Applications are accepted throughout the year and grants awarded every three months.

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Source: After School Africa

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